ALEXANDRIA \\ Anonymous Studios

•August 31, 2010 • Leave a Comment
ALEXANDRIA // Anonymous Studio

ALEXANDRIA // Anonymous Studio

Recent GaTech CoA Grad, Arseni Zaitsev, and Jonathan Henry, Sci-ARC Grad, are exhibiting their new installation ALEXANDRIA this weekend at YAF’s Summer Salon at Southern Polytechnic State University.

ALEXANDRIA is a project, designed and fabricated, by Anonymous Studio. Southern Polytechnic State University commissioned “ALEXANDRIA”, an architecture/art/sculptural installation from Anonymous Studio to be placed in the Architecture Gallery on campus from August 23, 2010 through December 15, 2010. Young Architects Forum opens its biannual exhibition of young professional work “SUMMER SALON 2010” with the opening reception for “ALEXANDRIA” by Anonymous Studio.

Anonymous Studio seeks to employ digital fabrication techniques and responsive conditions to create a physically and discursively interactive installation called ALEXANDRIA. They utilizes a simple conical figure emphasizing its place in the room and transitioning from a canopy system into an object in the space.

Hovering inches from the floor, ALEXANDRIA suspends itself in the space and refuse to acknowledge its relationship with the ground. The symbolic disillusionment with the political datum of the ground relinquishes the installation from prescriptive idealizations. ALEXANDRIA’s canopy will not be tainted by agendas but will be appropriated but those who are most likely to contribute to it.

ALEXANRIA is a recursive element meant to become a repository of current work occurring at SPSU. Each panel of the surface is intentionally documented and easily producible in order to allow the students to participate in the layering of their projects onto the frame of ALEXANDRIA. It will be a place of storing and retrieving the ongoing studio work that occurs concurrent with its lifespan. Upon entering into the space, the surface is fully opaque. This lends itself to the presentation of student work. As you transition to the far side of the piece, the work of the student fades and the work of the artist appears. The increased opacity, thinner panel coverage, allows the viewer to see the paneled surface behind the students work and creates two surfaces, the surface of the exterior screen element and the reverse surface of the opaque presentation area. This internal/external dilemma is produced with its internality prohibited from occupation, creating an imagined space of occupation surrounded by the amassed knowledge of the higher education system.

Sourced from Anonymous Studio

ALEXANDRIA // Anonymous Studio

ALEXANDRIA // Anonymous Studio

ALEXANDRIA // Anonymous Studio

ALEXANDRIA // Anonymous Studio

ALEXANDRIA // Anonymous Studio

ALEXANDRIA // Anonymous Studio

ALEXANDRIA // Anonymous Studio

ALEXANDRIA // Anonymous Studio

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Insecticide \\ 1st Avenue Machine & Clark

•May 31, 2010 • Leave a Comment

The Glassy Underworld \\ Shayna Leib

•April 7, 2010 • Leave a Comment

When using glass as a medium the outcome is part experimental and part intentional. The outcome of the final product is, like most arts, a byproduct of the characteristics of the material itself. Shayna Leib plays off of the fluidity of glass but does so with intense aggregation. While the overall effect might be able to be accomplished through a single unit, the aggregation of multiple pieces creates a textural surface that promotes a visual investigation of the depth of the individual pieces.

Leib utilizes the frame as a constricting unit of most of her aggregated pieces. This frame mimics the frame of the photograph resembling the images from national geographic of the coral reefs in the deep ocean. Leib projects the designs out of the frames and created an extended three-dimensionality to the glass fields.

Through the larger framed pieces  you can see the intensity of the extruded forms supported by the color gradient achieved. If we look at ‘Andaman’ we can see the background is a beige field of tubes. As we move across the surface and encounter moments of extreme formal extrusion, the color intensifies. From left to right the color of maximum extrusions change, suggesting that behind the tubes is a rainbow field but that only comes to surface in conjunction with the formal intensity.

The glass works suggest an aggregated mode of field creation along with utilization of color correlation and sea creature figuration. The pieces are frozen moments of intensity for us to study topically and recognize three-dimensionalliy.

Antilles-Shayna Leib

Antilles-Shayna Leib

Bypass Detail-Shayna Leib

Bypass Detail-Shayna Leib

Current Detail-Shayna Leib

Current Detail-Shayna Leib

Flores-Shayna Leib

Flores-Shayna Leib

Penobscot-Shayna Leib

Penobscot-Shayna Leib

Emerge Detail-Shayna Leib

Emerge Detail-Shayna Leib

Organelle-Shayna Leib

Organelle-Shayna Leib

Sourced by Shayna Leib

A Scripted Life \\ Jose Parla

•April 6, 2010 • Leave a Comment

Yeah it has been a month since the last post but I have not left. This is a blast from my inspiration past and continues to feed me with an ever intensifying intricacy.

Jose Parla’s work centers on his ability to mobilize the skills of a graffiti artist into a layered effect of painting that resembles the natural formation of the urban condition. The focus of his work is calligraphy that is often a flurry of white on an intense and richly conceived background.

While the calligraphy resembles the chaotic script of the hastily tagged walls that you will find in any major city, there is not just one tag.  Through my life in cities I have always found tags as creative expression of an artist and not necessarily the public nuisance that some would situate it. I found myself intently studying tags to try to cut through the swoops and swirls and piece together the typographic lettering into a recognizable word. This contrived formation is intentional. Tags are not created on the fly. They are worked over and over again until the right amount of individuality and aggressive directionality is reached. This is much the same way that any design field works. Parla’s work however is through a style of charretted tagging, leaning towards copious output rather than a finalized and crisp singularity. While the motions and the flows from one stroke to another are held in his muscle memory, the tag itself maintains its intentional illegible. Without content to uphold the meaning of the tag, the emphasis is placed on shape, form, aggregation, and directionality.

The stage set for the tagging is ripped straight from the urban fabric. Resembling the construction site walls of plywood in the city, the backgrounds are created to reproduce the layering of posters plastered then ripped, and plastered again. Serendipitously the urban plan is produced in this same piecemeal and palimpsestic way. These works show the way in which contemporary forms created in the architectural community can layer into the existing fabric to register new layers into the city. Parla’s compositions hold great variety while focusing on a narrowed set of problems.

Jose Parla

Jose Parla

Jose Parla

Jose Parla

Jose Parla

Jose Parla

Jose Parla

Jose Parla

Jose Parla

Jose Parla

Sourced from Jose Parla

Objects of Desire \\ Anonymous Studio

•March 7, 2010 • 1 Comment
Rift - Object of Desire Exhibition - Anonymous Studio

Rift - Object of Desire Exhibition - Anonymous Studio

The computer has created a new way of understanding our world (see previous post), and in turn have created the ability for the designer to produce that which was previously inconceivable.

The objects displayed in the ‘Objects of Desire’ Exhibition at the MODA in Atlanta are not buildings but can be seen as an investigation in the processes that will soon enough have an impact on the building community. Concepts such as modules, sections, and pattern are various ways of extracting from the computer the information needed for the designs to become manifested in reality. Coupled with these modes of transcription, the designers seemed to be extremely specific with materials, their limitations and assets. Each of the projects utilizes the materials they are made of as an integral part of their designs and utilized their attributes as friction for their forms.

The theory of the object is something that has blurred the lines of the architect and the artist. Each of these object have function and so reside on the side of architecture, but through the use of the computer they are able to attack the senses in similar ways to sculpture. The objects create sensation and seek play off of preconceived notions of formal typologies of furniture and ask the viewer to imagine the world in a different way. They ask us to forget the obvious, the standard, and look for the designed and the abnormal. These objects are not always comfortable nor are they always antagonistic. There is a wide breadth of styles and types that give all the opportunity to seek empathy with one and to make foes out of others.

Rift - Object of Desire Exhibition - Anonymous Studio

Rift - Object of Desire Exhibition - Anonymous Studio

In this piece, ‘Rift’, the digital, the physical, and the conceptual coalesce into a singularity of the object. The form created is a mix of materiality, gravity and design. The modualistic properties of the surface create the variance that allows for emergent form. This piece is a great example of one of the foremost issues that designers deal with. As ‘one who creates’ it is not possible to see and understand every outcome of the design process. If this were the case we would never have the ability to create anything other than what we already know. This piece and the rest of the pieces of the show ask us to accept conditions unforeseeable in design as a way to propagate our knowledge and our search for the object within our desires. When we allow the reigns of design to flex and relax the outcome produced becomes richer and more vibrant with conflict that gives flavor to the design.

Atlanta Invasion - Object of Desire Exhibition - Anonymous Studio

Atlanta Invasion - Object of Desire Exhibition - Anonymous Studio

In Atlanta Invasion, we see this conflict purposely inflicted on the object. When what looks to be a stool in one images, we look to another and it is presented as a formidable skyscraper in the Atlanta skyline. This friction codifies Anonymous’s relationship to their children of objects. Never content with the outcome they seek to push for more and see their baby birds fly.

Urban Intimacy - Object of Desire Exhibition - Anonymous Studio

Urban Intimacy - Object of Desire Exhibition - Anonymous Studio

When the objects are not being wrangled into pins they were not intended for, the lessons learned are used to produce intrinsically architecturally scaled projects. ‘Urban Intimacy’ takes the sensibilities of the objects designed. It takes their tangibility, their construction technique, and their core values and amalgamates the content into an environment that has the texture of the object.

While the objects are of desires, they too are objects of the age, objects of the zeitgeist. The pieces are manifestations of the principals of design thought that is being pursued by young professionals in design. The pieces cross the boundaries of architecture, sculpture, and product, made sit in a purgatory of design that wishes not to make claims of one classification over the other. The most powerful aspect of this collection is this recognition of cross discipline design and it willingness to take full advantage of this blurred line.

The exhibition was , contributed and curated  by Arseni (Senya) Zaitsev, Founder and Creative Director of Anonymous Studio. Anonymous Studio is a creative laboratory for design that helps bring innovative ideas to reality through experiments in architecture, design, fabrication, material research and management.

Spinal Lamp - Arseni Zaitsev

Spinal Lamp - Anonymous Studio

Spinal Lamp - Arseni Zaitsev

Spinal Lamp - Anonymous Studio

Swell - Arseni Zaitsev

Swell - Anonymous Studio

Swell - Arseni Zaitsev

Swell - Anonymous Studio

Envy - Gabe Landes

Envy - Gabe Landes

Envy - Gabe Landes

Envy - Gabe Landes

Wrath - Ritesh Rathi

Wrath - Ritesh Rathi

Wrath - Ritesh Rathi

Wrath - Ritesh Rathi

Greed - Lindsay Miller

Greed - Lindsay Miller

Greed - Lindsay Miller

Greed - Lindsay Miller

Glutony - Karen Mackay

Glutony - Karen Mackay

Glutony - Karen Mackay

Glutony - Karen Mackay

Urban Intimacy - Anonymous Studio

Urban Intimacy - Anonymous Studio

Atlanta Invasion - Anonymous Studio

Atlanta Invasion - Anonymous Studio

Rift - Anonymous Studio

Rift - Anonymous Studio

Rift - Anonymous Studio

Rift - Anonymous Studio

1GB Midterm ’10 \\ Jonathan Henry

•March 4, 2010 • Leave a Comment

I was invited to attend the 1GB midterm review at SCI-Arc on Wednesday. While there I was able to see half of the students from the studio as they were struggling and working on the problems set by their studio. While not all of the students have the same background, these students are in their second semester of ‘architecture’ work. The issues addressed through the brief were quite interesting.

The program was a Recreational Center located just outside the doughnut of highways that create an implied demarcation line around the city proper. The main intent of the brief is a struggle that defines the avant-garde approach.  I myself have fallen, many times, into the trap that their studio was seeking to relieve themselves of. Known as the top down approach, the model for the process of architectural design is easy. Start with a concept. With a well flushed out concept make every move echo your intent. By the end of the design process (i.e. when your instructors give you a deadline) your design will reflect your intent and will be legible, if not to society, to the jury invited.

Rather than creating what you plan on creating, the studio professors sought to use a bottom up approach. What this entails is a kind of wandering exploration through geometry. While some of my classes used formal geometry as the condition to create the unexpected, this studio was utilizing networked and aggregated systems. First, they started with physical explorations. The students went to models without preconceived notions. Stacking, grouping, folding and twisting, the physical models were objects of their own, devoid of architectural intent. Step two was to be critical of your newly emerged conditioned. While some explorations were wildly more successful than others, the next step was to infuse program. They were to take their models and site them with programs of their choice.

Here is a twist. Identifying topologies of objects through the classifications of line, surface, volume; the explorations were categorized and appreciated for what they were. As anybody knows who has worked on the creative fringe of formal geometries, you cannot just take your diagram and put it on the site. Some would caress, some would jam and cram and some just threw it all away in favor of what they already know. Taking a leap into the unknown is no easy feat. With direction from those that came before you blindly follow some procedure that does not fit your understanding of architecture.

I always say that if you are in school and you are a rebel and you rebel against anything anyone tells you, you will never learn. The point of being in school is to broaden your horizons and to seek for other ways of doing things in an effort to learn. Only after appreciating and learning can we be critical. Criticality without understanding is just short sidedness.

The professors left the students with a lot of room to work. Rather than dictating program, the students were allowed to choose their own programs from a matrix of possibilities. The professors were being VERY generous with this open-endedness. The point of this freedom was kind of like asking someone to be your valentine and giving them a box of chocolates. The candy is there to tell you that things are going to work out despite their reservations. To prove that their earlier studies were not in vein the students could choose programs that fit their interests (unfortunately some of the students still needed to do their homework on the specificity required of the programs they chose).

The matrix consisted of [line, surface, volume] in the x direction, and [vertical, horizontal, and differential] in the y direction. From this matrix they could choose the programs that best fit their emergent conditions or choose ones that directly fought it (I am in favor of contrasts as much as the next designer but in this situation if you choose to select programs that are not conducive to your initial studies, then you waste time and waste the opportunity for extracting an emergent condition from them).

What a lot of the students did was to choose programs but not pay attention to the requirements of the programs.  Some used their choices as a way for all geometry to be appropriated. This is an easy way out. These students chose specific programs in order to relinquish program from becoming a design principal. By doing this they are shot in the foot just before the hike leave and will be in the rear of the pack the entire trail.

Precisely what their exploration needs is a critical choice of program. Because program was pushed from the onset, and real buildings are expected as an outcome, the programs they choose will give their formal explorations the  much needed push to change them from concepts to designs. While some students chose well and some chose poorly, out of those that chose well the attention to specifics was lacking.  This problem led some of the jury to suggest more restraints (I agree). Looking towards the final, the students needed more than program to tackle the transformation from the emergent to the designed. Suggestions ranged from multiple ontology, buildings system, structural systems and site conditions. I totally agree. Their next step is to take the fascinating things that they made and poke at them and make the objects do things that they were not intended to do. This would create a feedback loop of emergence.

Final note is that this is one way of attacking the problem of design. In the same way that the brief rails against procedural design, this is just that, a procedure. Follow the suggestions of your professors, they are very talented and have been working at these problems for longer than you knew that they were problems. Explore with intent and have fun. This is just the midterm and a lot of work is still to come and I look forward to seeing the final outcome!

Grad Thesis Brief \\ Jonathan Henry

•February 28, 2010 • Leave a Comment

In recent years we have seen a resurgence of emotive intent in architectural design. We have shifted emphasis from formal processes that aspired to produce readings, to voluptuous productions that aspired to produce affects. These designs from contemporary architects have sought to utilize vector primitive shapes for the creation of the architectural form through the faux-manifestation of dynamic site effects.

Much the same way a picnicking couple would search in the clouds of the sky; these monolithic single surface objects are doomed to the reading of figuration. Within this style of design there remains a vast separation from the gesture of the form and the sensation of the audience.

Value must be placed in the sensation created in the audience through the articulation of surface geometry. Through utilization of the visual sense to initiate sensations of the tactile, the geometry will play off of multiple senses of the audience in unison. It is my intent to not only to solicit the reading of the overall form, but simultaneously layer discrete sensational readings of the building that unfold through proximity to the surface. As the procession from afar to the interior of the building progresses, the building will initiate multiple and varied readings. Through the use of surface articulation at multiple scales, the building can engage notions of the visual and tactile in the audience and produce a more sensorial building in the built environment.

This method of surface articulation is possible on many levels of design. Each scale, while having the ability to achieve this effect, requires varied scopes of concentration. With the building, it is necessary to work with articulated surface. When approaching the urban scale, it is the built figuration that can produce these effects.

Through the utilization of varying layers of surface articulation, I intend to make room for the use of ornament in contemporary design. If successful, the design will be able to shift audience perception of it and allow for legibility of discreet sensations in combination to changing proximity.